Drug Driving and the Law

drug driving and the law

The law relating to drug driving has been in force for a few years now but certain aspects of it continue to cause difficulty.

The law was changed to plug a gap and to make it easier to detect and charge motorists driving under the influence of drugs or with drugs in them over prescribed limits whether they were impaired or not. It brought the drug drive laws into line with drink driving. Police were given new equipment to carry out saliva swipes and require blood samples.

For the first time the law also listed legal and illegal drugs that could form the basis of a charge if prescribed [read on]

Alcohol Immobilisers

Alcohol Immobilisers

 

Motorists in parts of France who have been convicted of drink-driving could only be allowed back behind the wheel after serving any ban if their car is fitted with an alcohol-activated immobiliser.

The UK has a mixed legal position that appears fragmented. Low-level alcohol offenders generally just serve their ban and then reapply for a licence. As long as they are not High Risk Offenders, or don’t have a history of persistent alcohol misuse they will get a licence again. Others are monitored by the DVLA using medical reports from GPs.

It can seem very hit and miss. I have [read on]

Driver Alcohol Detection Systems for Safety (DADDS)

alcohol detection

 

These have been in the pipeline for quite some time.

Now Volvo is to install technology in its self-driving cars that can detect if the driver is drunk. They will use a combination of in-car cameras and sensors to spot if the motorist is showing signs of being over the limit.

Cars will slow down before ringing the Volvo call centre, and a member of staff will speak to the driver and take over the car if necessary.

The self-driving vehicle may even park the car by itself if the driver is unresponsive.

Sensors in the car will monitor changes in the physical movements of both the [read on]

Were the proceedings started in time?

were proceedings started in time

I often get asked this. Many people have an idea that most motoring prosecutions have to be started within 6 months of the date of the offence and are puzzled when a Postal Requisition or Single Justice Procedure Notice (SJPN) arrive after 6 months. Sometimes they can arrive very late.

In most instances there is no good reason for the police to be so slow, but they can be.

Prosecutions are usually started in one of two ways. The most common is SJPN which requires the recipient to respond by pleading guilty or not guilty. No court date is fixed unless it’s a not guilty plea or the [read on]

Celebrity acquittals give the wrong message.

Recent Home Office figures showed a 43% rise in the number of motorists going to court during the course of the last four years. The number of motorists facing court action in 2013 was 240,000 and this increased to 342,000 in 2017. This is an astonishing increase. At the same time the number of fixed penalty notices issued by police declined from 1,201,000 996,000.
Why has it happened? There are two factors that might contribute.
In April 2017 the penalty for using a mobile phone whilst driving was increased from 3 to 6 points. The penalty points increase for this offence means that more [read on]

On Yer Bike!


As a recent 60 year old I decided I needed a challenge outside the courtroom and I'm sure over the years many an opponent has wished I'd get on my bike (lots of other people too I expect).

I have been doing just that for quite a few months and will be taking part in the Prudential London 100 on the 29 July. It's a bike ride of 100 miles from Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, west into Surrey (nasty hills they have in Surrey) and then back for a finish on the Mall. It's a timed ride so no slacking is allowed.

I feel fortunate to be well enough to do it, and am using my place to raise money for [read on]

New Breath Test Devices Will Likely Convict More Motorists

New testing devices look likely to bring about some swift changes to drink drive breath samples. Drink drivers are to face swifter processing thanks to new roadside breathalyser technology that will allow police to gather on-the-spot proof.

Mobile evidential breath tests will allow police to gather early evidence of drink driving, by taking a breath sample from suspect drivers at the roadside. The instant test means they will not need to be taken back to a police station to obtain evidence as is currently the case.

It will mean those marginally over the drink drive limit will not have [read on]

Speed limits could rise to 60mph when less activity is taking place on motorway roadworks

At last the frustration caused by this looks as though it will be removed. Drivers have long asked why low speeds are required even when no one is working and it has tended to bring speed control into disrepute.

Motorway roadwork speed limits will be increased to 60mph as long as they can be safely operated.

Highways England, which runs the UK’s motorway network, says it is “working hard to reduce drivers’ frustration” with roadworks, and will be conducting a trial to see if higher limits can be introduced during periods when less work is being carried out.

Current [read on]

Keep the right side of the law when driving in the snow

Much of the UK has been hit with severe weather over the past few days. The plummeting temperature can lead to all sorts of problems for road users if they're not careful enough.

While most drivers will know the importance of clearing the car windscreen sufficiently, many may not be aware that failing to brush snow off the car roof can land you with a fine of £60 and points on your licence.

Under section 229 of the Highway Code it clearly explains how drivers should prepare their car before they set off in adverse weather conditions - You must be able to see, so clear all snow [read on]

Should the UK have graduated driving licences?

Graduated driving licenceUK Prime Minister Theresa May has hinted at further restrictions to new drivers, in an effort to cut road casualties.

The Department for Transport is due to research a 'graduated licencing system', similar to those used in various other countries around the world, that could potentially ban new drivers from carrying passengers and driving at night.

This particular issue was raised by Jenny Chapman, Labour MP for Darlington, after a child was killed in her constituency by a learner driver. Figures demonstrated that a quarter of young drivers (between age 17 and 24) are involved in an [read on]

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